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Author: Jennifer Forman Orth

Invading your brain since 2002.


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Wednesday, November 09, 2005

 
Otter Pops

How sad is this? People in Eugene Oregon are so used to not seeing river otters (Lutra canadensis) in their wetlands, they though recent sightings must have been nutria (Myocastor coypus). Luckily, as reported by the Corvalis Gazette-Times, it turns out that river otters really have returned to the Amazon Creek, possibly due to recent restoration efforts in Eugene's wetland habitats. Even better news: one was spotted eating a baby nutria ;-).






7 Comments:

I refuse to find that sad.

By Blogger Chris Clarke, at 11/10/2005 01:37:00 PM  

Which part? The part where Oregonians don't even know what a river otter looks like, or the part where the river otter eats a baby nutria?

By Blogger Jenn, at 11/10/2005 02:38:00 PM  

Either one.

By Blogger Chris Clarke, at 11/10/2005 05:01:00 PM  

Only one nutria consumed? Go for it, otters!

By Blogger Alan, at 11/10/2005 09:05:00 PM  

Hmmm...how about explaining why Chris? I think it is sad if people in Eugene mistake river otters for nutria, especially if it is because all they have ever seen are nutria. There is something to be said for being able to appreciate your natural heritage, no?

I'm with Alan, too - I have to admit that thinking of otters eating nutria brought a smile to my face.

By Blogger Jenn, at 11/10/2005 09:38:00 PM  

Just like the Lake Erie water snakes eating the invading Round Goby's. Yay otters.

By Blogger Donwatcher, at 11/12/2005 12:07:00 AM  

Actually, I was the person interviewed and they got the story all wrong. It was a nutria that ate the otter.

By Anonymous Anonymous, at 11/12/2005 12:32:00 PM  

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